Featured Resources

5 ACTIONS TOWARDS DATING YOUR SPOUSE DURING COVID-19

MARCH 26, 2020
BRAD HAMBRICK, COUNSELOR AND AUTHOR


So, how do you go on a date when you aren’t allowed to leave your house? A month ago, this question would have been a lame set of jumper cables to start a conversation when there wasn’t anything to talk about. Now, it’s beginning to feel like an essential marital survival skill.


Many of us are learning how to work from home. If both spouses are doing this, it can feel like “we are spending more time together than ever before” (in corresponding news, many couples are also second guessing whether they ever want their spouse to retire). We’re realizing that “time together” and “dating” are not the same thing.


In this article, we’ll consider five actions to help you meaningfully date your spouse during a time period where you can’t leave your home.


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EVERYTHING'S CANCELED! DEALING WITH DISAPPOINTMENT IN PANDEMIC

MARCH 24, 2020
ABBEY WEDGEWORTH, THE GOSPEL COALITION


On March 14, actress Jennifer Garner extended a social-media invitation to “preschoolers to professionals” whose games, meets, recitals, and productions had been canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She urged them to share what they’d been working on (using the hashtag #heyjenlookatme) so that she could share it “with the world,” adding tenderly, “because I want to see.”


I enjoyed following along as she shared dance routines and monologues, but I’ve also grieved as I’ve considered the tangential losses that the coronavirus has caused all over the world: massive denominations with canceled meetings, brides with canceled weddings, seniors who won’t get to walk across the stage in cap and gown, athletes who have lost the chance to compete, students who have lost one-eighth of their college experience, families whose vacations have been canceled, fans who don’t get to see their favorite artists, children who won’t be able to share cupcakes with friends on their birthdays. Some of these things can be rescheduled, but some cannot.


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KING JEHOSHAPHAT AND THE CORONAVIRUS

FEBRUARY 6, 2020
JASON SEVILLE, THE GOSPEL COALITION

  

“We do not know what to do, but our eyes are on you.”

 

As I sit in my apartment in coronavirus-laden China, I’m hard pressed to think of a better prayer than that one, uttered by a desperate but confident Judean king named Jehoshaphat (2 Chron. 20:12).

 

The eyes of an anxious world are on this global health crisis. Companies and schools in China are delaying operations. Borders are closing. And in recent days many airlines have suspended all travel in and out of this great country. As an American who pastors in China, our decision to stay now feels like a clear “burn the ships!” moment.

 

Our prayer? We do not know what to do, but our eyes are on you, Lord.

 

Jehoshaphat’s ancient perspective is more apropos for February 2020 than we might think. In his context, a dangerous delegation from Edom was closing in on Judah. But his faith was all-encompassing. He wasn’t just trusting the Lord in the face of potential military defeat, but for any disaster that may come!


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IT'S OKAY TO FEAR CORONAVIRUS

MARCH 18, 2020
PAUL TRIPP, PAUL TRIPP MINISTRIES


We find ourselves in a time of unprecedented trouble. Faced with a global pandemic, we need to take a moment to think biblically about our response to COVID-19.

 

I only have one thought that I will repeat in today’s devotional: Be afraid, but don’t give way to fear.

 

That statement may seem contradictory, so let me explain.

 

Fear is one of God’s good gifts to us. I think there are three types of spiritually healthy fear:

 

1. Fear of God. This is a holy reverence of the Almighty, living in awe of, and submitting to, the King of the universe.

 

2. Rapid Response Fear. This is our instinctual ability to react in a moment of danger. Think of a parent who spontaneously leaps into action to protect their child right before they hurt themselves.

 

3. Appropriate Concern: This allows us to be sobered by what we are facing, and with our God-given ability to analyze, we make wise and planned choices to protect ourselves and those we love.


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C. S. LEWIS ON THE CORONAVIRUS

MARCH 12, 2020
MATT SMETHURST, THE GOSPEL COALITION


It’s now clear that COVID-19 is a deadly serious global pandemic, and all necessary precautions should be taken. Still, C. S. Lewis’s words—written 72 years ago—ring with some relevance for us. Just replace “atomic bomb” with “coronavirus.”


"In one way we think a great deal too much of the atomic bomb. “How are we to live in an atomic age?” I am tempted to reply: “Why, as you would have lived in the sixteenth century when the plague visited London almost every year, or as you would have lived in a Viking age when raiders from Scandinavia might land and cut your throat any night; or indeed, as you are already living in an age of cancer, an age of syphilis, an age of paralysis, an age of air raids, an age of railway accidents, an age of motor accidents.”


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DON'T WASTE YOUR FAMILY QUARANTINE

MARCH 19, 2020
COURTNEY REISSIG, THE GOSPEL COALITION


A month ago, our school district closed unexpectedly for a couple of days because of the flu. Our family had already been hit hard by it, so it came as no surprise to me. Since I had recently been out of town, I was actually thankful for the extra days at home with my kids.

 

But then coronavirus protocols took effect, and all our daily activities were upended. No longer are we looking at a few days off to rest from the flu. Now, we’re staring down the barrel of multiple weeks at home with nothing to do.

 

Many parents are in the same situation. We have to think through not only the disruption to everyday life, but also how to lead children through cancellations that affect them.   


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A PRACTICAL WAY TO LOVE YOUR (SELF-ISOLATED) NEIGHBOR

MARCH 18, 2020
ELIJAH ELKINS, THE GOSPEL COALITION


Over the last year my wife, Tana, and I have been gathering with a few Christian neighbors in our small village for friendship and fellowship. Often we’ve prayed for our village, asking God to show us how to love and serve our neighbors.

 

A few days ago, we began praying in a more specific way: How do we love our neighbors now? How do we love them even if they’ve gotten the coronavirus?

 

Jesus said we, his followers, are to be the salt of the earth and light of the world. This is who we are. This is our identity. We are to illumine places and feelings and topics of darkness and fear. We are to prevent decay and preserve life. We are to continue shining in the face of COVID-19. And we’re to love our neighbors who’ve caught coronavirus.


As A. W. Tozer put it, “A frightened world needs a fearless church.”   


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10 GIFTS I PRAY GOD GIVES THE CHURCH THROUGH THE CORONAVIRUS

MARCH 18, 2020
ORION BERRIDGE, "FOR THE CHURCH" BLOG FROM MIDWESTERN SEMINARY


As the ban on gatherings increased and churches lost their ability to gather for corporate worship, I woke up in the middle of the night with a familiar passage stuck in my head: . . . not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near (Heb. 10:25 ESV). ​I thought, “What a cruel passage for a pastor to sit and ponder in the night watch.” But then I remembered what led up to that verse: Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works . . . (Heb. 10:23-24 ESV). These two verses erupted in prayer from deep within me as I sat there thinking about my hope for my family, and the church that I pastor. “God, help us hold fast to you. Make us a hope-filled people that make people wonder who this God is that we have such confidence in. And Father, awaken us, even as isolated as we are, to stir one another up and see the body of Christ love like never before.” It was a simple prayer. I laid back down feeling satisfied like one does after a good meal, and, just as I was about to fall asleep, I realized I was still hungry. I wasn’t finished praying. A flood of prayers and hopes followed, which I wrote down asking God to give the church through this trial. Maybe you hope for some of the same things. Maybe you will pray for these with me. . . .


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